Should children be made to catch up on their education?

Over the last 12 months many children have missed out on a huge chunk of their education. There have been times when the schools have been shut completely and parents or carers have had to try and home school their children. Some parents did this religiously and others really struggled and found that they couldn’t get the children to concentrate and complete the tasks that were set for them. Most of the children will have fallen behind to some degree due to these missed lessons. The UK is hopefully over the worse of the restrictions and we are hoping that after the summer holidays schools will be able to relax the bubbles and social distancing rules. The government and education authority are now looking at ways in which they can help those students who have fallen behind and also there are a few different ideas being batted around, nothing has been confirmed as of yet. There were talks of cutting down the 6 week summer holiday, but the fact that this hasn’t been announced yet, looks like it is unlikely to happen. The other options may include extending the school day for everyone by 30 mins or running optional class from 8am until 6pm.

Are schools ready for the return of pupils

The government have announced that all pupils (unless ill or isolating) should return to school in September ready for the new term. Some students have now had 6 months off school and this has put a lot of pressure on parents and there is a worry that it is also affecting the mental health of many of the pupils too.

Although many are keen to see the schools return there is also a worry for parents and teachers as to how safe it will be and how social distancing is going to be maintained. Most schools have adopted a policy of keeping children within their own bubbles of either year groups or classes. This will allow them to try and limit the risk of spreading the virus if someone does become infected.

Not only have teachers got a lot of work to catch up on and may find that some pupils require a fair bit of time to re-establish a routine, they also have extra job roles such as cleaning equipment and possibly redoing lesson plans that involved close contact with others.

The first few months of returning to school will probably be quite hard and may require a fair few changes before proper routines can be established again.

What is the job of a supply teacher?

The job of a supply teacher can vary quite a bit. In some instances, you will be expected to just cover a day or so of lessons and not have to do much planning. In other instances, where you are covering a class for a longer period, you are likely to have to plan lessons, mark work and basically do the job of the usual teacher.

If you are qualified as a teacher, then you have the decide to go in to supply teacher rather than a permanent position or this may be a something that you do when you are looking to go part time. A supply teacher will often find that their role varies from school to school and often even from class to class meaning that each day is different and there are new challenges.

Supple teachers are often paid more per day than permanent teachers so often they only need to work three days a week to earn the same as a permanent teacher who works five days a week. It is important to remember though that supply teachers do not get paid for the holidays unless they are on some sort of a contract which states they will.

Many teachers say that they enjoy supply teaching and find it more interesting than teaching the same class day in day out.

Making the change from school to university

Many students have just had their first half term at university and it can often be very different to what they have been used to at school.

University is quite often about independent learning, and you must be motivated to work on your own, meet deadlines, revise and research. You will not be pushed as much as at school to attend, so if you do not put the effort in the chances are you will not be successful. Without drive and determination, you’ll likely to struggle with the university workload and timetable.

Going to university is a must for some students who have a career in mind which requires them to have a degree. Other students still may not know exactly what they want to do but attend university to study a subject they enjoy, which they hope will help them in future when it comes to finding work.

Lecturers are there to help you, but they may only help if you show a high level of commitment. You can get kicked off a course if you do not attend or fall way behind. If you are struggling with work rather than letting it get out of hand, speak to your lecturer and ask if you can help some extra help or time to complete your work.

Do you dream of a career in teaching?

Teachers don’t always get it easy. It is quite a challenging job to do at times and you will be expected to work on your “days off” to fit in all your marking and planning not to mention parents evenings and school trips.

Due to the pressures and time constraints, many teachers who have recently qualified actually end up leaving the industry in the first year. This means there is a constant need for new teachers coming through the system. Some schools are having to rely heavily on teaching assistants to spend a significant period of time teaching the class on their own rather than actually assisting the teacher, which is not ideal. Also many schools are turning to supply teachers to fill gaps whilst they are looking for replacement teachers to employ.

If you fancy a change in career and are up for a challenge, then why not train to be a teacher. Often the main issue is people not being aware of how much work is involved in being a teacher. You may think it’s a cushy job working 9 -3 and weekends off but this simply isn’t realistic and you will be expected to work a lot more hours than this.